Toxic Substances

Florida Mesothelioma Lawyers, Florida Mesothelioma Division Launched

Free Legal Shield has launched a Florida Mesothelioma Lawyer Helpline for victims of asbestos. There is funds for asbestos victims in various trusts that were set up for the purpose of compnesatin mesothlioma victims.

Mesothelioma and Asbestos Lawyer Helpline

What you need to Know

  • A trust fund allows the companies responsible for the asbestos exposure to plan their expenditures for compensation.
  • The trust fund is funded by mandatory contributions from the companies who built their profits on asbestos.
  • The trust fund is part of  a Chapter 11 proceeding for the companies who have declared bankruptcy 
  • Congress introduced special treatment for companies facing an overwhelming burden from asbestos litigation.
  • The company must commit at least 50% of their reorganized equity to a trust fund which will be used to pay asbestos claims.
  • The trust funds  from which benefits will be drawn will be funded by contributions from several dozen companies who have caused victims to get mesothelioma from asbestos.
  • The   contribution is set by the law.
  • The contribution is determined by the  liability and capacity to contribute
  • Filing an asbestos bankruptcy trust claim requires showing evidence of an asbestos related injury.
  • Most trusts identify categories and levels of diseases that are eligible for various amounts of compensation.

Evidence Of An Asbestos Related Injury

Medical Documentation of Asbestos Disease Claim

  • Reports showing that the claimant has been diagnosed with an asbestos-related .
  • Documentation describing to what extent asbestos contributed to your disease.
  • A statement from a treating doctor  regarding the diagnosis.
  • Evidence that you were  exposed to asbestos at the company’s facilities or from the company’s products

It is best to get help from an asbestos lawyer with experience in these claims to make sure they are done correctly and to help gather the information. This is a tedious process which you and your family should not have to deal with on your own.

 

Facts about Benzene Exposure, Toxic Substances Lawyers

Facts About Benzene
What benzene is

    Benzene is a chemical that is a colorless or light yellow liquid at room temperature. It has a sweet odor and is highly flammable.
    Benzene evaporates into the air very quickly. Its vapor is heavier than air and may sink into low-lying areas.
    Benzene dissolves only slightly in water and will float on top of water.

Where benzene is found and how it is used

    Benzene is formed from both natural processes and human activities.
    Natural sources of benzene include volcanoes and forest fires. Benzene is also a natural part of crude oil, gasoline, and cigarette smoke.
    Benzene is widely used in the United States . It ranks in the top 20 chemicals for production volume.
    Some industries use benzene to make other chemicals that are used to make plastics, resins, and nylon and synthetic fibers. Benzene is also used to make some types of lubricants, rubbers, dyes, detergents, drugs, and pesticides.

How you could be exposed to benzene

    Outdoor air contains low levels of benzene from tobacco smoke, gas stations, motor vehicle exhaust, and industrial emissions.
    Indoor air generally contains levels of benzene higher than those in outdoor air. The benzene in indoor air comes from products that contain benzene such as glues, paints, furniture wax, and detergents.
    The air around hazardous waste sites or gas stations can contain higher levels of benzene than in other areas.
    Benzene leaks from underground storage tanks or from hazardous waste sites containing benzene can contaminate well water.
    People working in industries that make or use benzene may be exposed to the highest levels of it.
    A major source of benzene exposure is tobacco smoke.

How benzene works

    Benzene works by causing cells not to work correctly. For example, it can cause bone marrow not to produce enough red blood cells, which can lead to anemia. Also, it can damage the immune system by changing blood levels of antibodies and causing the loss of white blood cells.
    The seriousness of poisoning caused by benzene depends on the amount, route, and length of time of exposure, as well as the age and preexisting medical condition of the exposed person.

Immediate signs and symptoms of exposure to benzene

    People who breathe in high levels of benzene may develop the following signs and symptoms within minutes to several hours:

  •         Drowsiness
  •         Dizziness
  •         Rapid or irregular heartbeat
  •         Headaches
  •         Tremors
  •         Confusion
  •         Unconsciousness
  •         Death (at very high levels)

    Eating foods or drinking beverages with Benzene in them:

  •         Vomiting
  •         Irritation of the stomach
  •         Dizziness
  •         Sleepiness
  •         Convulsions
  •         Rapid or irregular heartbeat
  •         Death (at very high levels)

    If a person vomits because of swallowing foods or beverages containing benzene, the vomit could be sucked into the lungs and cause breathing problems and coughing.
    Direct exposure of the eyes, skin, or lungs to benzene can cause tissue injury and irritation.
    Showing these signs and symptoms does not necessarily mean that a person has been exposed to benzene.

Long-term health effects of exposure to benzene

    The major effect of benzene from long-term exposure is on the blood. (Long-term exposure means exposure of a year or more.) Benzene causes harmful effects on the bone marrow and can cause a decrease in red blood cells, leading to anemia. It can also cause excessive bleeding and can affect the immune system, increasing the chance for infection.
    Some women who breathed high levels of benzene for many months had irregular menstrual periods and a decrease in the size of their ovaries. It is not known whether benzene exposure affects the developing fetus in pregnant women or fertility in men.
    Animal studies have shown low birth weights, delayed bone formation, and bone marrow damage when pregnant animals breathed benzene.
    The Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) has determined that benzene causes cancer in humans. Long-term exposure to high levels of benzene in the air can cause leukemia, cancer of the blood-forming organs.

How you can protect yourself, and what to do if you are exposed to benzene

    First, if the benzene was released into the air, get fresh air by leaving the area where the benzene was released. Moving to an area with fresh air is a good way to reduce the possibility of death from exposure to benzene in the air.
        If the benzene release was outside, move away from the area where the benzene was released.
        If the benzene release was indoors, get out of the building.
    If you are near a release of benzene, emergency coordinators may tell you to either evacuate the area or to “shelter in place” inside a building to avoid being exposed to the chemical. For more information on evacuation during a chemical emergency, see “Facts About Evacuation” at http://emergency.cdc.gov/planning/evacuationfacts.asp . For more information on sheltering in place during a chemical emergency, see “Facts About Sheltering in Place” at http://emergency.cdc.gov/planning/Shelteringfacts.asp .
    If you think you may have been exposed to benzene, you should remove your clothing, rapidly wash your entire body with soap and water, and get medical care as quickly as possible.
    Removing your clothing
        Quickly take off clothing that may have benzene on it. Any clothing that has to be pulled over the head should be cut off the body instead of pulled over the head.
        If you are helping other people remove their clothing, try to avoid touching any contaminated areas, and remove the clothing as quickly as possible.
    Washing yourself
        As quickly as possible, wash any benzene from your skin with large amounts of soap and water. Washing with soap and water will help protect people from any chemicals on their bodies.
        If your eyes are burning or your vision is blurred, rinse your eyes with plain water for 10 to 15 minutes. If you wear contacts, remove them after washing your hands and put them with the contaminated clothing. Do not put the contacts back in your eyes (even if they are not disposable contacts). If you wear eyeglasses, wash them with soap and water. You can put your eyeglasses back on after you wash them.
    Disposing of your clothes
        After you have washed yourself, place your clothing inside a plastic bag. Avoid touching contaminated areas of the clothing. If you can't avoid touching contaminated areas, or you aren't sure where the contaminated areas are, wear rubber gloves or put the clothing in the bag using tongs, tool handles, sticks, or similar objects. Anything that touches the contaminated clothing should also be placed in the bag.
        Seal the bag, and then seal that bag inside another plastic bag. Disposing of your clothing in this way will help protect you and other people from any chemicals that might be on your clothes.
        When the local or state health department or emergency personnel arrive, tell them what you did with your clothes. The health department or emergency personnel will arrange for further disposal. Do not handle the plastic bags yourself.
    For more information about cleaning your body and disposing of your clothes after a chemical release, see “Chemical Agents: Facts About Personal Cleaning and Disposal of Contaminated Clothing” at http://emergency.cdc.gov/planning/personalcleaningfacts.asp .
    If you think your water supply may have benzene in it, drink bottled water until you are sure your water supply is safe.
    If someone has swallowed benzene, do not try to make them vomit or give them fluids to drink. Also, if you are sure the person has swallowed benzene, do not attempt CPR. Performing CPR on someone who has swallowed benzene may cause them to vomit. The vomit could be sucked into their lungs and damage their lungs.
    Seek medical attention right away. Dial 911 and explain what has happened.

How benzene poisoning is treated

Benzene poisoning is treated with supportive medical care in a hospital setting. No specific antidote exists for benzene poisoning. The most important thing is for victims to seek medical treatment as soon as possible.
How you can get more information about benzene

People can contact one of the following:

    Regional poison control center: 1-800-222-1222
    Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
        Public Response Hotline (CDC)
            800-CDC-INFO
            888-232-6348 (TTY)
        E-mail inquiries: cdcinfo@cdc.gov

    Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), Pocket Guide to Chemical Hazards

Benzene exposure is a hazard for certain Work environments. If you or a loved on has been seriously injured due to Benzene exposure on the job call 1 800 733-5342 for a consultation with a Benzene exposure lawyer. Benzene exposure can come from the following work environments: Painters,Mechanics ,Railroad workers , Ship and ship yard workers, refinery workers.

Lawyers for Benzine Exposure and Mesothelioma

Benzene Exposure has been  Blamed for Causing Leukemia and Anemia

If you have inhaled benzene as a result of your employment for a long period of time call 1 800 733 5342 for a workers compensation lawyer experienced in Benzene exposure today.

Mesothelioma is a malignant cancer of the lining of the lungs, heart, or abdomen that is caused by inhaling asbestos fibers. Many mesothelioma victims are given 8 to 12 months to live.

In addition to mesothelioma, workplace exposure to asbestos can also increase the risk of lung cancer, asbestosis, and other diseases of the larynx, lungs, kidneys, and other internal organs.

Benzene is now known to be the cause of various kinds of acute and chronic leukemia as well as non-Hodgkins lymphoma and aplastic anemia. These illnesses may affect you shortly after exposure to benzene or take years to develop.

Petroleum and tire workers, painters, and mechanics are among the groups of workers who are exposed to benzene both through inhaled fumes and contact with the skin on a daily basis

The toxic chemical benzene is a solvent found in a variety of other chemicals, including most glues, adhesives, paints and stains, plastics, and pesticides. It is also used in gasoline and cigarettes. Benzene is one of the most common chemicals in the world and is a leading cause of deadly cancers, including Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia, and anemia.

Benzene Exposure Risks

Benzene is used in so many chemicals and products, millions of Americans have been exposed to it in levels that are potentially harmful. The following products are among the most common sources of benzene:

  • Paint and stain fumes
  • Manufacturing of plastics, detergents, glues and dyes
  • Pesticides
  • Hazardous waste areas
  • Cigarettes
  • Gas Refineries
  • oil rig workers
  • Burning coal and oil
  • Automotive exhaust

Acute Myelogenous Leukemia (AML)

Acute Myelogenous Leukemia is a rare, but deadly form of cancer that affects the myeloid line of white blood cells. It causes rapid growth of abnormal cells, which then build up in the bone marrow and interfere with the production of normal blood cells. AML is the most common type of acute leukemia among American adults and becomes more common as people age. About 13,000 people are diagnosed with AML each year in the United States, including about 4,200 in children under age 19. AML currently accounts for about 1.2% of all cancer deaths in the United States, but that number is expected to rise as the nation’s population grows older.

Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL)

Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL) is another disease commonly associated with benzene exposure. CLL affects a type of white blood cell called “B Cells” which are infection fighters inside the bone marrow. CLL damages the B Cells so they can no longer fight infection. When this happens, infections can quickly spread throughout the body.

Benzene Exposure Symptoms

 

Benzene exposure can result in the following symptoms:

  •     Abdominal pain or “fullness”
  •     Abnormal bleeding
  •     Bone or joint pain
  •     Enlarged spleen, lymph nodes, and liver
  •     Excessive bruising
  •     Fatigue
  •     Fever
  •     Infection
  •     Malaise (vague feeling of bodily discomfort)
  •     Reduced tolerance for exercise
  •     Weight loss

These symptoms are also often associated with the flu or other common diseases. To determine if benzene exposure is the cause of these symptoms a blood test can be used. Doctors then analyze the blood to check for a specific blood abnormality related to benzene exposure.

If you are experiencing any of these symptoms and believe you have been exposed to benzene, you should consult with your doctor and inform him/her of your possible benzene exposure. Your doctor may then make arrangements for a diagnostic test. Once you know you have Benzene related exposure comolications contact a workers compensation lawyer experienced in Benzene exposure.

Attorney referral Service has Mesothelioma Workers Compensation  Attorneys ready to help you if you have been injured in the following Florida cities: Boca Raton, Bradenton, Cape Coral, Clearwater, Coral Gables, Daytona, Delray Beach, Fort Lauderdale, Fort Myers, Fort Pierce, Fort Walton Beach, Gainesville, Hialeah, Hollywood, Homestead, Jacksonville, Key West, Kissimmee, Lakeland, Largo, Melbourne, Miami Miami Beach, Naples, New Smyrna Beach, Ocala, Orlando, Panama City, Pensacola, Plantation, Pompano Beach, Port Saint Lucie, Palm Beach, St. Petersburg, Sarasota, Tallahassee, Tampa, Tarpon Springs, Titusville, Venice, Vero Beach, West Palm Beach, West Pensacola, Winter Garden, Winter Haven, and Winter Park.

Attorney Referral — Florida  Mesothelioma Workers Compensation   Lawyers are ready to help you if you have been injured in the following counties:Alachua, Baker, Bay, Bradford, Brevard, Broward, Calhoun, Charlotte, Citrus, Clay, Collier, Columbia, DeSoto, Dixie, Duval, Escambia, Flagler, Franklin, Gadsden, Gilchrist, Glades, Gulf, Hamilton, Hardee, Hendry, Hernando, Highlands, Hillsborough, Holmes, Indian, River, Jackson, Jefferson, Lafayette, Lake, Lee, Leon, Levy, Liberty, Madison, Manatee, Marion, Martin, Miami-Dade, Monroe, Nassau, Okaloosa, Okeechobee, Orange, Osceola, Palm Beach, Pasco, Pinellas, Polk, Putnam, Santa, Rosa, Sarasota, Seminole, St. Johns, St. Lucie, Sumter, Suwannee, Taylor, Union, Volusia, Wakulla, Walton, and Washington

We also have Mesotherlioma Workers Compensation lawyers in the following Georgia counties and cities: Fulton County, DeKalb County, Atlanta GA, Sandy Springs GA, East Point GA, Redan GA, Riverdale GA, Snellville GA, Conyers GA, Covington GA, McDonough GA, Hampton GA, Lawrenceville GA, Johns Creek GA, Roswell GA, Woodstock GA, Marietta GA, Smyrna GA, Mableton GA, Douglasville GA, Buford GA, Canton, GA.Columbus, Albany